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No Secondary Voltage

Transformer secondary voltage can be too high, too low or there may be no voltage. Please note that transformer voltage is a ratio of the primary voltage. If the primary voltage is too high or too low, the secondary voltage will also be too high or too low.

Check: Solution:
No secondary voltage. Verify the transformer primary is energized.
Perform a continuity check on the primary and secondary coils. If a continuity check fails on the secondary, also perform a continuity check on the tap cables. If the tap cables are bad, replace the tap cables. If the continuity check fails and it is not the result of the tap cables, the transformer will need to be either repaired or replaced.
If one phase a delta secondary has no voltage check to make sure that one of the three legs are grounded. If two legs are grounded, remove the ground from one of the legs.
Verify all connection points (lugs and pads) are tight, smooth and cleaned of any insulation. Replace jumpers or lugs if they are damaged. Verify the mounting surfaces are clean of insulation and smooth. Verify any mechanical components are tight. In some cases a braise joint at a lug or pad point may be damaged and cause excessive heat.
Inspect transformer for visual signs of a short circuit including damaged or burned insulation or smoke. If the transformer has been damaged, the transformer may need to be either repaired or replaced.
Verify all connection points (lugs and pads) are tight, smooth and cleaned of any insulation. Smooth or replace pads and lugs if damaged or rough. Tighten any loose mechanical connections. Clean off any insulation remaining on electrical connection points.

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